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Audi Car Lineup: The Audi Hierarchy Explained & The Different Types Of Audi Car

Understanding the different types of Audi car and the hierarchy in which they sit can be difficult. After all, the German car manufacturer boasts 38 different models in their line up. 

These range from the Audi A1 city car to the R8 supercar, the luxurious Q7 SUV and the all-electric e-tron. 

In this piece, we’re going to give you an overview, explain the different types of spec you can have and give some pros and cons of each.

But to understand the car, you must first understand the company. And that’s where we’ll start. 

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The History Of Audi

How Audi Names Its Cars

Audi Glossary

Audi A1

Audi A3 | S3 | RS 3

Audi A4 | S4 | RS 4

Audi A5 | S5 | RS 5

Audi A6 | TFSI e | S6 | RS 6

Audi A7 | S7 | RS 7 

Audi A8 | TFSI e | S8 

Audi Q2 | SQ2

Audi Q3 | RS Q3

Audi Q5 | TSFI e | SQ5

Audi Q7 | TFSI e | SQ7

Audi Q8 | SQ8 | RS Q8

Audi TT | TTS | TT RS

Audi R8

Audi e-tron

The History Of Audi

Audi certainly has an interesting past. In fact, for large portions of its existence, it wasn’t called Audi.

The name as we know it today came about in 1965 – a year after the Volkswagen Group took control. But its origins stretch back much further. 

However, before we talk about the beginning, we must first explain the logo. The famous four rings are known and beloved around the world. But they also have a deeper meaning. 

Audi Logo

They symbolise the coming together of four automotive manufacturers during The Great Depression in 1929. These companies were Audi, DKW, Horch and Wanderer.

And it’s with Wanderer where the official story starts, as it was the first of the four to be created. So, although some argue Audi was only created in the mid-1960s, its roots trail back to 1885. 

It wasn’t much longer after that the world was introduced to the Audi marque. In the late 1800s, a mechanical engineer named August Horch started his own company; August Horch & Cie. 

They built simple-engined cars, but after a falling out with the board of directors in the early 1900s, he went his own way and started a new company.

August Horch

Following a legal dispute, Horch was banned from using his family name in the business title due to August Horch & Cie already being in existence. So, he translated it to Latin, and the name Audi, meaning ‘to listen’, was born. 

But that was far from the last hurdle the company overcame. Following The Great Depression – where Audi merged with three other companies to become Auto Union AG – war broke out. 

Focus switched from building cars to supporting the German military. And following Allied victory, Auto Union found their factory positioned deep inside Soviet Union territory, where it was dismantled and destroyed. 

Auto Union AG was instructed to cease trading and disband, but in 1949, the Zwickau plant started building again; supplying East Germany with much of its cars. 

After 10 years of production, and more than three million units sold, Daimler-Benz – the owner of Mercedes-Benz – bought out Auto Union AG. 

Auto Union Logo

But after Auto Union AG’s ageing design failed to capture the attention of the general public during the 1960s boom, Daimler-Benz disposed of it. 

By this time, Auto Union AG had a huge factory and Volkswagen was looking for somewhere to build more of their new Beetles. 

And that’s what happened for a while. VW had no intention of restarting Auto Union’s production until some of the mechanics revealed they’d built a car in secret. 

VW’s Chair; Heinz Nordhoff, was so impressed, he put it into production under the marque Audi. And so it was born, the first Audi as we know it today – the Audi 100. 

Audi 100

Since then, Audi has continued to design and manufacturer industry-leading vehicles to challenge BMW and Mercedes-Benz, as well as others, as part of the Volkswagen Group.

How Audi Names Its Cars

Audi uses an alphanumeric system – like BMW and Mercedes-Benz – to name its cars. 

Its more conventional road-going vehicles belong to the ‘A’ denomination, while its sportier models are branded ‘S’ and top-range, track-inspired editions don ‘RS’, which stands for RennSport – which roughly translates to ‘racing’.

The Q branding denotes Audi’s SUV or off-road-style vehicle, while the Audi TT, R8 and e-tron sit outside these categories. 

Typically, the numbers signify the ascent in space and size throughout the range, for example, the Audi A8 is larger than the Audi A1. 

However, that’s not always the case, as they can sometimes resemble a sportier version of the previous model. For example, the Q8 is a slightly smaller version of the Q7. 

Audi Glossary

A: Specifying the car is from Audi’s more conventional road-going range. It sits before a number in the car’s title. 

Avant: Audi’s term for an estate vehicle.

Cabriolet: Audi’s term for a convertible. Also see Roadster and Spyder. 

COD: No, not the famous video game; it stands for Cylinder On Demand, and it’s where the engine only uses two cylinders instead of four. A hard press on the accelerator will change it automatically to four. It’s a clever way of saving fuel. 

citycarver: Only applicable to the Audi A1. It gives the city car a higher ride as well as more robust wheel arches and bumpers. It’s sort of a super-small SUV. 

e-tron: This is Audi’s only all-electric car. 

MMI: Standing for Multi Media Interface, MMI is the touchscreen system on the dashboard. It’s where all the audio controls, tech features and vehicle settings can be accessed.

Pre-Sense: This is one of Audi’s latest safety features. It will analyse the road ahead and warn you if any hazards are detected. If it believes a crash is imminent, it will apply the emergency brake.

Q: The name given to Audi’s SUV category.

quattro: This is spelt with a lowercase ‘q’ and is the name for Audi’s all-wheel-drive system. It comes as standard on the majority of models. 

Roadster: A two-seater convertible. 

RS: Standing for RennSport, this is Audi’s track-inspired model version. It roughly translates to racing. 

S: This replaces the ‘A’ in the car’s name if it’s the sports version. 

Sportback: A sloped, sportier roof shape. 

Spyder: Another word for a two-seat convertible. Only used in the R8. 

S tronic: A double-clutch sequential automatic and manual gearbox. It gives you the choice of either automatic or manual gears. It’s similar to the DSG system in a Volkswagen.

TDI: A turbocharged diesel engine. 

TFSI: A more powerful and efficient turbocharged petrol engine. 

TFSI e: This is Audi’s hybrid technology. If there’s a model with a TSFI e version, it means it comes with both a turbocharged internal combustion engine and a battery powertrain.

Tiptronic: Single clutch automatic gearbox. 

Vorsprung Durch Technik: Audi’s slogan. It translates to progress or advancement through technology. Audi uses both Vorsprung and Technik as trim levels in some models, meaning head start and technology. Vorsprung is often the highest specification.  

The Different Types Of Audi Car

Audi A1

Audi A1

The A1 is Audi’s smallest car. It comes in two forms in the UK; the Sportback and the citycarver. 

With the Sportback, you have the choice of seven trims, from Technik to Vorsprung. 

As you’d expect, given its name translates to technology, even the entry-level Technik comes with an array of tech, including smartphone interface, Audi Pre-Sense front and lane departure warning. 

As you climb the range, there’s chunkier alloys, sportier styling packs, sports suspension and privacy glass to add, as well as lots of other tech and styling options. 

Under the bonnet, you have a large choice of engines, ranging from a 1-litre turbocharged power train which produces around 94bhp to a turbocharged 2-litre which churns out 197bhp. 

You can choose between a 5-speed or 6-speed manual gearbox, and there’s an S tronic double-clutch automatic option, too.

Audi A1 citycarver

The citycarver only comes in one trim level with a choice of four engines, ranging from 114bhp to 148bhp. You also have a choice between a 6-speed manual box and a 7-speed S tronic. 

Body Styles

  • Sportback
  • Mini SUV

Trim Levels

  • Technik
  • Sport
  • S line
  • S line Competition
  • S line Contrast Edition
  • Vorsprung 
  • citycarver

Engines

  • 25 TFSI – 94bhp
  • 30 TFSI – 114bhp
  • 25 TFSI S tronic – 94bhp
  • 30 TFSI S tronic- 114bhp
  • 35 TFSI S tronic – 148bhp
  • 40 TFSI S tronic – 197bhp

Advantages of Audi A1

  • Generous cabin space
  • Great entry-level spec
  • Smooth drive

Disadvantages of Audi A1

  • Expensive compared to other city cars
  • citycarver has no four-wheel-drive option
  • No diesel option

Audi A3 | S3 | RS3

Audi A3

The A3 is Audi’s most diverse model. It comes in six forms, from the entry-level Sportback to a saloon, an open-top cabriolet and the performance-focused RS3. 

Each model comes with its own range of specs, with bigger alloy wheels and sportier decal the most prominent changes through the ranks. 

Technology is ever-present in the A3 range, with the most basic model featuring navigation, parking sensors, cruise control, smartphone integration and Audi Pre-Sense Front. 

In both the Sportback and saloon versions of the standard A3, you can choose between manual or S tronic. 

And each has the choice of either a petrol or diesel engine, which at the top end will churn out around 148bhp. And while the diesel only comes in 2-litre, you have the option of a 1-litre, 1.5-litre or 2-litre petrol.

The cabriolet, meanwhile, comes with Audi’s four-wheel-drive system; quattro, and a more powerful 187bhp powertrain.  

Audi A3 Interior

In the S3, which is a sportier version of the A3 cabriolet, you only have the choice of one engine; a 2-litre, turbocharged petrol S tronic which creates almost 300bhp. 

There’s no hardtop version of the S3, so if you’re looking for a more performance-based Audi A3 sans cloth roof, you’re left with the RS3 Sportback or the RS3 saloon. 

Similarly to the S3, both, again, only have the option of one power source; a 395bhp, 2.5-litre petrol. 

In the RS, Audi quattro is standard, as is the S tronic gearbox. And this manufacturing feat will help you break 62mph from a standing start in a lightning 4.1 seconds. 

You can upgrade the RS3’s looks with the ‘Sport Edition’, which adds a sporty black styling pack to the car. 

And if you really want to push the limits on the track, Audi will increase the RS3’s electronically limited top speed from 155mph to 174mph.  

Body Styles

  • Sportback
  • Saloon
  • Cabriolet

Trim Levels

A3 Sportback
  • Technik
  • Sport
  • S line
  • Edition 1
  • Vorsprung 
A3 Saloon
  • Sport
  • S line
  • Edition 1
  • Vorsprung 
A3 Cabriolet
  • Sport
  • S line
S3 Cabriolet
  • S3 Cabriolet
RS3 Sportback
  • RS3 Sportback
  • RS3 Sportback Audi Sport Edition
RS3 Saloon
  • RS3 Saloon
  • RS3 Saloon Audi Sport Edition

Engines

A3 Sportback & Saloon

30 TFSI 6-Speed – 108bhp

35 TFSI 6-Speed – 148bhp

35 TFSI S tronic – 148bhp

30 TDI 6-Speed – 114bhp

35 TDI S tronic – 148bhp

A3 Cabriolet

35 TFSI 6-Speed – 148bhp

35 TFSI S tronic – 148bhp

40 TFSI quattro S tronic – 187bhp

S3 

S3 TFSI S tronic – 296bhp

RS3 

RS3 TFSI S tronic – 395bhp

Advantages of Audi A3

  • Well-balanced chassis
  • Healthy range of options for standard A3
  • Great driving car

Disadvantages of Audi A3

  • No hardtop S3
  • No diesel performance option
  • Reserved handling

Audi A4 | S4 | RS4

Audi A4

The Audi A4 is a more ‘grown-up’ version of the A3. Its smallest version is the saloon, which measures out a little larger than the BMW 3 Series and the Mercedes-Benz C-Class. But despite its size advantage, the A4 sits firmly in that bracket of car. 

When choosing your A4, you have six model types to pick from, ranging from the entry-level saloon to the standard and high-performance estates and even a crossover in the form of the A4 allroad.

Each model variant comes with its own trims. And for the first time, we see the Black Edition introduced into the Audi range, which de-chromes the car. The Black Edition is available on all but the A4 allroad and the RS4 Avant, although the RS4 has something similar. 

As you climb the trim levels, there are styling tweaks and wheel upgrades – some which are more prominent than others – as well as tech upgrades. 

Although, even the most ‘basic’ A4; the Technik, comes with Audi’s famous MMI Navigation, Parking System Plus, cruise control, smartphone integration, heated seats and in-car WiFi through Audi Connect. 

Audi A4 Interior

Across the A4 range, there’s a huge selection of engines to choose from. From the 2-litre petrol and diesel, which produce 148bhp and 134bhp respectively, all the way to the 2.9-litre monster which sits in the RS4 Avant and pumps out 444bhp. 

This raw power will propel you to 62mph in 4.1 seconds according to Audi, although there’s evidence to suggest it can do it in 3.7. 

If the RS4’s styling isn’t for you, however, the S4 sits in the hot saloon category, which will cover off 0-62mph in 4.7 seconds. 

In terms of boot space, the A4 Avant boasts five litres more space than a C-Class, although it’s marginally smaller than the largest 3 Series. 

Body Styles

  • Saloon
  • Estate
  • Crossover

Trim Levels

A4 Saloon
  • Technik
  • Sport
  • S line
  • Black Edition
  • Vorsprung 
S4 Saloon
  • S4 Saloon
  • S4 Black Edition
  • S4 Vorsprung
A4 Avant
  • Technik
  • Sport
  • S line
  • Black Edition
  • Vorsprung
S4 Avant
  • S4 Avant
  • S4 Black Edition
  • Vorsprung
A4 allroad
  • Sport
  • Vorsprung
RS4 Avant
  • RS4 Avant
  • Carbon Black Avant
  • Vorsprung

Engines

A4 Saloon & Avant

35 TFSI 6-Speed – 148bhp

35 TFSI S tronic – 148bhp

40 TFSI S tronic – 187bhp

45 TFSI quattro S tronic – 242bhp

30 TDI S tronic – 134bhp

35 TDI S tronic – 160bhp

40 TDI quattro S tronic – 187bhp

S4 Saloon & Avant

S4 3.0 V6 TDI quattro tiptronic – 342bhp

A4 allroad

45 TFSI S tronic – 242bhp

40 TDI quattro tiptronic – 187bhp

50 TDI quattro tiptronic – 282bhp

RS4 Avant 

RS4 Avant tiptronic  – 444bhp

Advantages of Audi A4

  • Wide engine range at entry level
  • Smooth drive
  • Quality materials & comfortable

Disadvantages of Audi A4

  • Higher CO2 emissions than rivals
  • No RS4 saloon
  • No dual-clutch gearbox option higher up the range

Audi A5 | S5 | RS5

Audi A5

The Audi A5 is a sportier take on the A4. It comes in three body styles, including a cabriolet, and seven model options, ranging from the entry-level coupe to the hardened five-door RS5 Sportback. 

From the front and the back, the A5 and A4 look remarkably similar. That’s not a bad thing, mind, the combination of LED lights, distinct edges and Audi’s four-rings provide a simple yet stunning finish. 

The interior is a similar story. A refined, minimalist cockpit with three-zone electronic climate control, twin-leather front sports seats, a spacious interior and a mountain of technology including Audi’s MMI, Parking System Plus, cruise control, smartphone integration and Audi Connect make for an excellent driving experience. 

Audi A5 Interior

But under the bonnet is where we see the most significant mechanical change. The smallest petrol engine is a 2-litre turbocharged power train which produces 187bhp – almost 50bhp more than the entry-level A4. The diesel is another turbocharged 2-litre creating 161bhp. 

As you climb the range, the option for more power becomes prominent, with both the RS5 coupe and Sportback housing the same 444bhp turbocharged 2.9-litre 8-speed tiptronic you find in the RS4 Avant.

The A5, then, is very much the more fun and sportier three or five-door option to the A4. 

Body Styles

  • Coupe
  • Cabriolet
  • Sportback

Trim Levels

A5 Coupe
  • Sport
  • S line
  • Edition 1
  • Vorsprung 
S5 Coupe
  • S5 Coupe
  • S5 Edition 1
  • S5 Vorsprung
A5 Sportback
  • Sport
  • S line
  • Edition 1
  • Vorsprung
S5 Sportback
  • S5 Sportback
  • S5 Edition 1
  • S5 Vorsprung
A5 Cabriolet
  • Sport
  • S line
  • Edition 1
  • Vorsprung
RS5 Coupe
  • RS5 Coupe
  • Carbon Black 
  • Vorsprung
RS5 Sportback
  • RS5 Sportback
  • Carbon Black 
  • Vorsprung

Engines

A5 Coupe & Sportback

40 TFSI S tronic – 187bhp

45 TFSI quattro S tronic – 242bhp

35 TDI S tronic – 160bhp

40 TDI quattro S tronic – 187bhp

S5 Coupe & Sportback

S5 3.0 V6 TDI quattro tiptronic – 342bhp

A5 Cabriolet

40 TFSI S tronic – 187bhp

45 TFSI S tronic – 242bhp

40 TDI quattro tiptronic – 187bhp

RS5 Coupe & Sportback

RS5 Avant tiptronic  – 444bhp

Advantages of Audi A5

  • Quality materials & comfortable
  • Responsive engines
  • Stunning styling and practicality combined

Disadvantages of Audi A5

  • Increased road noise with upgraded alloys
  • Not as fun as rear-wheel-drive competitors
  • No dual-clutch gearbox option at the top of the range

Audi A6 | TFSI e | S6 | RS6

Audi A6

The A6 is Audi’s mid-size luxury five-door. It comes in three forms; saloon, crossover and Avant.  

There are seven models to choose from, including the TFSI e, which combines both a petrol-powered internal combustion engine and an electric powertrain. 

The A6 is the smallest vehicle fitted with hybrid technology in the Audi range. It gives you 34 miles of all-electric travel and a WLTP mpg of between 166.2 to 188.3, depending on your power source. 

Combined, the electric-petrol mix pumps out 295bhp, and the batteries can be charged via a standard three-pin plug, which will take around six-and-a-half hours, or a 7kw home box, which takes two-and-a-half.

Across the range, space is at the forefront of design. And that shows with the ample boot room.

The saloon holds 535 litres, while the Avant adds an extra 30. Both of those are bigger than their respective BMW 5 Series rivals, although the Mercedes-Benz E-Class estate offers significantly more than the A6 Avant. 

Power again varies depending on the model you choose. The entry-level petrol engine is a 2-litre quattro which gives you 242bhp. The diesel is a 2-litre two-wheel-drive and provides 201bhp. 

Audi A6 Interior

Meanwhile, the RS6 Avant is a 4-litre powertrain which produces a monstrous 592bhp. 

If you’re looking for something in the middle, the s6 might be your best bet, with its 3-litre diesel engine which gives out 344bhp. 

On the technology front, the standard A6 features MMI Navigation, assisted parking, Pre-Sense Front, lane departure warning and Audi Connect. 

As you climb the trim levels, you get access to features such as Audi’s Virtual Cockpit, road sign recognition and MMI Navigation Plus. 

Body Styles

  • Saloon
  • Avant
  • Crossover

Trim Levels

A6 Saloon, TFSI e & Avant 
  • Sport
  • S line
  • Black Edition
  • Vorsprung 
S6 Saloon & Avant 
  • S6
  • S6 Vorsprung
A6 allroad
  • Sport
  • Vorsprung
RS6 Sportback
  • RS6 Avant
  • RS6 Carbon Black
  • RS6 Vorsprung

Engines

A6 Saloon & Avant

45 TFSI quattro S tronic – 242bhp

55 TFSI quattro S tronic – 335bhp

40 TDI quattro S tronic – 201bhp

50 TDI quattro S tronic – 282bhp

A6 TFSI e

50 TFSI e quattro S tronic – 295bhp

S6 Saloon & Avant

S6 TDI quattro tiptronic – 344bhp

A6 allroad

55 TFSI e quattro tiptronic – 335bhp

45 TDI quattro tiptronic – 228bhp

50 TDI quattro tiptronic – 282bhp

RS6 Avant

RS6 Avant tiptronic – 592bhp

Advantages of Audi A6

  • Excellent build quality
  • Smooth and quiet drive
  • Hybrid option

Disadvantages of Audi A6

  • Smaller boot space than E-Class estate
  • Steering not as responsive as competitors
  • All-touch MMI makes it hard to use while driving

Audi A7 | S7 | RS7

Audi A7

Much like the A5 is to the A4, the Audi A7 is a sportier take on the A6. 

While the A6 comes in saloon and estate form, the A7 is Sportback only. There are three models; the entry-level A7 Sportback, the S7 and the RS7. 

But unlike their rivals, BMW and Mercedes-Benz, Audi doesn’t offer a coupe version of its mid-size luxury Sportback. Despite the more aggressive roofline, it’s five-door only. 

Aside from the rear, there’s very little to differentiate the A7 and A6 in terms of interior and exterior styling. The A6 goes for chrome detailing on the front grille and lower third, while the A7’s is black which helps exaggerate the slightly sportier bonnet. 

Inside, the A7 has a little less space than the A6 – both in headroom and legroom – but makes up for it with an extra 15 litres of boot capacity – enough for an extra backpack or two. 

Audi A7 Rear

In terms of interior trim and technology, the A7 comes with a similar set up to the A6. Heated twin-leather front seats, dual climate control, MMI Navigation Plus, parking assistance, smartphone integration, cruise control and Audi Connect are all standard. 

As you climb the range, there’s an additional touchscreen and digital display added, as well as Audi’s Virtual Cockpit, four-zone climate control and added exterior styling. 

Under the bonnet, the engine range is fairly similar, too. The entry-level petrol is the same 2-litre turbocharged quattro you find in the A6. However, with the diesel, you get the choice of two 3-litre powertrains, instead of only one in the A6. 

There’s no hybrid option in the A7, and the top end RS7 again borrows the same engine from the RS6 – a 592bhp turbocharged 4-litre. 

Body Styles

  • Sportback

Trim Levels

A7 Sportback
  • Sport
  • S line
  • Black Edition
  • Vorsprung 
S7 Sportback 
  • S7
  • S7 Vorsprung
RS7 Sportback
  • RS7 Sportback
  • RS7 Carbon Black
  • RS7 Vorsprung

Engines

A7 Sportback

45 TFSI quattro S tronic – 242bhp

55 TFSI quattro S tronic – 335bhp

40 TDI quattro S tronic – 201bhp

45 TDI quattro tiptronic – 228bhp

50 TDI quattro tiptronic – 282bhp

S7 Sportback

S7 TDI quattro tiptronic – 344bhp

RS7 Sportback

RS7 Sportback tiptronic – 592bhp

Advantages of Audi A7

  • Excellent build quality
  • Smooth drive
  • Stylish design

Disadvantages of Audi A7

  • No dual-clutch gearbox in more powerful models
  • Road noise
  • Less interior space than A6

Audi A8 | TSFI e | S8

Audi A8

The A8 is Audi’s premium luxury saloon. The tagline given to the A8 is “refinement and luxury”, and it’s certainly that. 

Coming as standard or long-wheelbase – which adds an extra 12 cm of rear legroom – the A8 and A8 L are shrouded in fine materials and delicate design, providing a class-leading comfort experience. 

Adaptive air suspension, 18” alloys, dual touchscreen with digital display and Virtual Cockpit all come as standard, as does two-zone air conditioning, Valcona leather seats and a twin-spoke leather steering wheel. 

You can also upgrade to the Chauffer Pack, which enhances your rear passengers’ experience through digital TV reception. 

The range-topping S8, meanwhile, comes with 21” alloy wheels, Matrix LED lights, sportier seats, traffic sign recognition and a 360-degree parking camera. 

Audi A8 Interior

In the power department, both the entry-level petrol and diesel are turbocharged 3-litre tiptronics, while the meatier S8 gets a 4-litre turbocharged V8, producing 563bhp. 

With the standard and long-wheelbase A8, there’s also a hybrid option – a 443bhp 3-litre turbocharged petrol which will run 29 miles on all-electric power. 

Audi had hoped to upgrade the A8 with its all-new Level 3 autonomous driving technology – where the car will keep in lane and at the correct speed by itself. But they have since scrapped those plans, which is a little disappointing. 

Body Styles

  • Saloon

Trim Levels

A8 Saloon & L
  • Sport
  • S line
  • Black Edition
  • Vorsprung 
A8 Saloon & L TSFI e
  • Sport
S8 
  • S8 Saloon
  • Vorsprung

Engines

A8 Saloon & L

55 TFSI quattro tiptronic – 335bhp

50 TDI quattro tiptronic – 282bhp

A8 Saloon & L TSFI e 

60 TFSI e quattro tiptronic – 443bhp

S8 Saloon

S8 TFSI tiptronic – 563bhp

Advantages of Audi A8

  • Stunning hybrid engine
  • Sleek styling
  • Excellent tech as standard

Disadvantages of Audi A8

  • No dual-clutch gearbox option
  • No Level 3 autonomous upgrade coming
  • Despite the incredible luxury, still not as good as an S-Class

The Audi Q Range

The Q range is Audi’s SUV offering. From the compact Q2 to the imposing Q8, the Qs provide a higher seating position, more driving flexibility and an overall enthralling experience. 

Audi Q2 | SQ2

Audi Q2

The Q2 is Audi’s smallest SUV. It’s based on the same chassis as the Audi A3, but it’s yet to receive the Ingolstadt company’s famous interior makeover. 

It’s still a nice place to be. DAB radio, cruise control, air conditioning and Audi Pre-Sense Front all come as standard, but the entry-level spec isn’t as generously kitted out as other models. 

You get the choice of two model variants with the Q2; the standard and the S. Aside from the boost in power, you get upgraded headlights, alloys, suspension and dual climate control. 

Audi Q2 Interior

Space wise, there’s 405 litres of boot room, which decreases to 355 litres if you choose the four-wheel-drive quattro version. 

In the cabin, there’s ample room in the front and back, with a 60:40 seat splitting option to extend luggage capacity. 

Under the bonnet, the entry-level petrol engine is a punchy turbocharged 1-litre, while the diesel is a turbocharged 1.6-litre. 

At the top end, the SQ2 boasts 296bhp, which derives from a 2-litre turbocharged petrol powertrain. 

Body Styles

  • SUV

Trim Levels

Q2
  • Technik
  • Sport
  • S line
  • Black Edition
SQ2
  • SQ2
  • Black Edition

Engines

Q2

30 TFSI 6-speed – 114bhp

35 TFSI 6-speed – 148bhp

35 TFSI S tronic – 148bhp

40 TFSI quattro S tronic – 187bhp

30 TDI 6-speed – 114bhp

30 TDI S tronic – 114bhp

30 TDI quattro S tronic – 148bhp

SQ2

SQ2 TFSI S tronic – 296bhp

Advantages of Audi Q2

  • Great handling
  • Excellent resale value
  • Wide range of engines

Disadvantages of Audi Q2

  • Not as spacious as other models in price range
  • Slightly dated interior
  • Not different enough from A3

Audi Q3 | RS Q3

Audi Q3

The second Q model to be based on the A3 is the Audi Q3. While the Q2 is a ‘city SUV’, the Q3 is larger and more robust. 

The Q3’s main rivals are the BMW X1 and the Mercedes-Benz GLA, and it eclipses both in terms of space and equipment. 

In fact, there’s more than a hint of the luxurious Audi Q8 in the Q3, in both design and feel. Everything in the cabin is high-quality, and it’s spacious, too. 

The entry-level seating is cloth, although full leather is available as you climb the specs. But no matter the material, the Q3 provides a comfortable ride, particularly with adaptive suspension added. 

You get two body styles with the Q3; the more conventional boxy SUV look and the eye-catching Sportback. 

Audi Q3 Interior

In terms of technology, the Q3 is a class leader, particularly as standard. MMI Navigation, rear parking sensors, cruise control, Pre-Sense Front and lane keep assist all feature on the base model. 

While as you spend more, you get upgraded navigation, parking assistance and adaptive cruise control.

Amplifying its size difference, there’s no 1-litre turbo option in the Q3, as there is in the Q2. Instead, the entry-level petrol is a 1.5-litre turbocharged six-speed manual, while the diesel is a 2-litre turbocharged quattro – both of which produce 148bhp. 

The top-spec RS Q3 also gets a bigger dose of power than the SQ2, churning out 395bhp. 

Despite being made from the same underpinnings, the Q3 and Q2 are extremely different, and if you’re looking for a bonafide compact SUV, the Q3 wins in almost every department. 

Body Styles

  • SUV
  • Sportback

Trim Levels

Q3 & Q3 Sportback
  • Sport
  • S line
  • Edition 1 
  • Vorsprung
RS Q3 & RSQ3 Sportback
  • RSQ3
  • RSQ3 Audi Sport Edition
  • RSQ3 Vorsprung

Engines

Q3 & Q3 Sportback

35 TFSI 6-speed – 148bhp

35 TFSI S tronic – 148bhp

40 TFSI quattro S tronic – 187bhp

45 TFSI quattro S tronic – 227bhp

35 TDI quattro 6-speed – 148bhp

35 TDI S tronic – 148bp

35 TDI quattro S tronic – 148bhp

40 TDI quattro S tronic – 187bhp

RS Q3 & RSQ3 Sportback

RS Q3 Sportback S tronic – 395bhp

Advantages of Audi Q3

  • Huge engine range
  • Great standard equipment
  • Highly desirable SUV

Disadvantages of Audi Q3

  • Gearbox can feel unresponsive at times
  • Ride not as comfortable by Audi’s high standards
  • More expensive than its rivals

Audi Q5 | TFSI e | SQ5

Audi Q5

The Q5 is Audi’s mid-size luxury SUV. For a long time, it was the highest-selling model in its class across the world; a class which consists of the BMW X3 and Mercedes-Benz GLC, among others. 

You’d think, then, that it would receive special treatment from Audi; ensuring it stays at the top of its game. And that’s exactly how it feels. 

While it’s yet to receive Audi’s interior facelift – which will be coming in 2021 – inside is still meticulously crafted with fine materials. 

Twin leather sports seats, three-zone electronic climate control, ample space and rear-seat flexibility. And although the Q5 is coming to the end of its life in this form, it’s still eye-catching.

Another feather in the Q5’s cap is its hybrid powertrain. It’s the smallest of the Q range to receive electrified technology, which will take you 26 all-electric miles on a full charge. 

Audi Q5 Interior

It also makes tax cheaper, and the WLTP mpg tops out at 117.7, which is an essential option for a car of this size. 

The internal combustion components in the hybrid come from either a turbocharged 2-litre petrol engine producing 295bhp, or the same set up making 362bhp. Both are considerably more powerful than the entry-level petrol, which produces 242bhp, and the standard diesel, which is lower on power still at 187bhp. 

At the top end of the range – the SQ5 – sits a 3-litre turbocharged diesel powertrain producing 342bhp. 

Although there’s no seven-seat option in the Audi Q5 – yet – and there’s no Sportback option – yet – and it’s being replaced at the end of this year, it’s still a sensational all-round SUV. 

Body Styles

  • SUV

Trim Levels

Q5 
  • Sport
  • S line
  • Black Edition 
  • Vorsprung
Q5 TSFI e 
  • S line
  • Black Edition
  • Vorsprung
  • S line Competition
  • Vorsprung Competition
SQ5
  • SQ5
  • SQ5 Vorsprung

Engines

Q5

45 TFSI quattro S tronic – 242bhp

40 TDI quattro S tronic – 187bhp

TFSI e

50 TFSI e quattro S tronic – 295bhp

55 TFSI e quattro S tronic – 362bhp

SQ5

SQ5 TDI tiptronic – 342bhp

Advantages of Audi Q5

  • Technology still excels against others in the market
  • Great handling
  • Excellent hybrid engines

Disadvantages of Audi Q5

  • Exterior styling slightly dated
  • Low engine range
  • Slow entry-level diesel engine

Audi Q7 | TFSI e | SQ7

Audi Q7

The Q7 is Audi’s flagship luxury SUV. It’s a five-metre, seven-seat monster that, Audi claims, ‘redefines’ luxury. 

It’s certainly luxurious. From out to in there’s intricate thought and detail in every stroke and stitch. And as usual with Audi, the bits that come as standard challenge anything else out there on the market. 

Matrix LED headlights, 19” alloys, MMI Nav Plus with Virtual Cockpit and air suspension all come with the entry-level spec. As do several driving aids, such as lane departure, cruise control with speed limiter and Pre-Sense Front. 

You can upgrade to chunkier wheels and sports suspension, but whether you’d want that in a seven-seat cruiser is questionable. 

Speaking of seats, both the second and third row of seating is foldable, making way for a huge amount of space. While all five rear seats, as well as the front passenger seat, have Isofix points. 

Audi Q7 Interior

As you’d expect, leather is standard from the entry-level spec, as is dual-zone climate control and a meaty steering wheel. 

Further up the spec chain, you’ll find extra features such as self-park, hill-hold assist and sharper styling. 

At entry-level, you’re afforded the choice of three 3-litre V6 engines, one petrol and two diesel – all of which come with mild-hybrid technology. 

Mind you, despite the electric help, the Q7’s efficiency isn’t going to be winning any awards anytime soon; with a high WLTP of 34 mpg. 

That being said, there’s also a full hybrid option, which comes with the same 3-litre V6 petrol powertrain as the standard. 

With the added electricity, which will take you 27 miles by itself on a full charge, you could reach 85.6 mpg – a considerable increase compared to the standard internal combustion engine.

At the top of the range; the SQ7, you’re afforded a 4-litre V8 producing 439bhp. 

Body Styles

  • SUV

Trim Levels

Q7 
  • Sport
  • S line
  • Black Edition 
  • Vorsprung
Q7 TSFI e 
  • S line
  • Black Edition
  • Vorsprung
  • S line Competition
  • Vorsprung Competition
SQ7
  • SQ5
  • SQ5 Vorsprung

Engines

Q7

45 TFSI quattro S tronic – 242bhp

40 TDI quattro S tronic – 187bhp

TFSI e

50 TFSI e quattro S tronic – 295bhp

55 TFSI e quattro S tronic – 362bhp

SQ7

SQ5 TDI tiptronic – 342bhp

Advantages of Audi Q7

  • Luxury for up to seven
  • Practical and robust
  • Excellent standard kit

Disadvantages of Audi Q7

  • Mute styling
  • Lower residual value compared to competitors
  • Slow entry-level diesel engine

Audi Q8 | SQ8 | RS Q8

Audi Q8

As is the trend, the Audi Q8 is the sportier version of the Q7. A tall and imposing silhouette is replaced by a sleeker, more angle-driven offering. From every corner, it’s sensational to look at. 

But unlike other Audi models, there’s no low-priced entry-level to whet your appetite. With the Q8, you’re straight into the S line from the outset. 

As standard, the Q8 comes with 21” alloy wheels, MMI dual touchscreen navigation, autonomous parking, S line styling and sports suspension. 

If you’re willing to part with a little more cash, the Vorsprung grants you even bigger alloys, black styling, a head-up display, adaptive cruise control and blind-spot monitoring. It’s about as close as you can come right now to autonomous driving. 

But as is the case with most Audis, there’s always more to have. And it’s the same with the Q8, with the SQ8 and RS Q8. 

Audi Q8 Interior

At the top end, you’re surrounded by every bell and whistle Audi has to offer, as well as the same 4-litre V8 you find in the RS6 and RS7 which will get you from 0-62 in 3.8 seconds.  

It’s a far cry from the entry-level petrol and diesel options. But that’s not to say they’re sluggish. Both are 3-litre V6s producing 335bhp in petrol form and 282bhp in diesel. 

But with the sportier styling comes one issue; space. The Q8 is still a monstrous car; however, not big enough for seven seats. And with the sloped hatchback-style roof, you lose out on headroom, too. 

Body Styles

  • SUV Sportback

Trim Levels

Q8 
  • S line
  • Edition 1 
  • Vorsprung
SQ8
  • SQ8
  • SQ8 Vorsprung
RS Q8
  • RS Q8
  • RS Q8 Carbon Black
  • RS Q8 Vorsprung

Engines

Q8

55 TFSI quattro tiptronic – 335bhp

50 TDI quattro tiptronic – 282bhp

SQ8

SQ8 TDI tiptronic – 429bhp

RS Q8

RS Q8 tiptronic – 592bhp

Advantages of Audi Q8

  • Outstanding quality
  • Sensational looks
  • Excellent standard kit

Disadvantages of Audi Q8

  • Expensive as new
  • Poor economy
  • Only five seats

The Other Audis

Alongside, the A and Q models, Audi offers the TT – its sports coupe – R8 – a fully-fledged supercar – and the e-tron – Audi’s only all-electric vehicle, so far. 

Audi TT | TTS | TT RS

Audi TT

The TT is Audi’s only out-and-out sports coupe. It’s not a remake of another model; it’s its own being. 

Since its launch in 1998, the TT has always been striking in design. It’s always sent a message. And the current generation – the third of its kind – is no different. 

It adopts Audi’s angry headlight design at the front, coupled with the all-consuming front grille. 

As you climb the specs in the standard TT, you’ll notice the odd design tweak at the front, but apart from the Black Edition, the appearance remains fairly consistent. Which is by no means a bad thing. 

However, one design feature that’s different to the norm is the screen. All of Audi’s conventional vehicles have a centre screen. In the TT, there isn’t one. 

Audi TT Interior

Instead, the screen sits in place of the speed dials – which are digital. Within it, aside from the speedometer, you’ll find Audi’s famous MMI interface, navigation and smartphone integration. 

Away from the screen, rear parking sensors, hill-hold assist and cruise control all come as standard. As do 18” alloy wheels and Xenon headlights. 

Further up the range, bigger alloy wheels, LED headlights and sportier seats feature, as does more track-focused styling. 

But one thing made more for Brighton beach than Donington Park is the option for a convertible roof. 

Available throughout the entire range, dubbed the Roadster, the sports coupe adopts a mechanical material roof. 

Of course, with luxury comes sacrifice, and in the Roadster, it’s the lack of rear seats – not that there is a huge amount of space in the back of the hard top anyway, although the seats can be lowered. 

But the soft top does also affect boot space. The Roadster loses 25 litres of boot space against the hard top with its seats up – a massive 432 litres with them down. 

Under the bonnet, however, they’re the same. An entry-level TT gives you a 2-litre turbocharged petrol engine producing 194bhp. The RS, meanwhile, gives you more than double from a 2.5-litre TFSI quattro which will cover 62mph in 3.7 seconds. 

Body Styles

  • Coupe
  • Roadster

Trim Levels

TT Coupe & Roadster
  • Sport
  • S line
  • Black Edition 
  • Vorsprung
TTS Coupe & Roadster
  • Coupe/Roadster
  • Black Edition
  • Vorsprung
TT RS Coupe & Roadster
  • RS Coupe/Roadster
  • Audi Sport Edition
  • Vorsprung

Engines

TT Coupe & Roadster

40 TFSI S tronic – 194bhp

45 TFSI S tronic – 241bhp

45 TFSI quattro S tronic – 241bhp

TTS Coupe & Roadster

TTS TFSI S tronic – 302bhp

TT RS Coupe & Roadster

TT RS S tronic – 396bhp

Advantages of Audi TT

  • Driver-centric cockpit
  • Great design
  • Best in class

Disadvantages of Audi TT

  • Too sensible
  • Firm ride
  • Smaller boot compared to competitors

Audi R8

Audi R8

The R8 is Audi’s contribution to the supercar world. But it’s not like most others. It’s an everyday supercar. 

Inside, ergonomics and comfort, like every other Audi, are at the forefront of design. 

Although that’s not to say it isn’t special or it’s squishy. A fire-breathing V10 engine, sports suspension and dynamic handling ensure it remains perfect for the track.

But inside, it’s not a stripped-back frame with scaffolding poking out the floor. It’s refined; luxurious almost. 

The Audi R8 shares the same driving position as the TT. Its screen, which houses everything from your current speed to navigation and parking assistance, sits behind the steering wheel – ensuring your attention isn’t taken away from driving. 

And you really feel as though you’re in a race car with the R8, thanks to its leather sports bucket seats which have a more contoured design for increased lateral support. 

Audi R8 Interior

However, the aesthetics are all well and good, and they really are good – both inside and out – but the main reason for buying an R8 is speed and power. And it doesn’t disappoint. 

You have the choice of three engines with the R8, all V10s, producing a range of 533bhp to 612bhp. No matter which you choose, you’ll be jumping from 0-62 mph in a little over three seconds and won’t stop until you’re north of 200 mph. 

This is achieved with help from a new carbon fibre anti-roll bar, which weighs in 40 per cent lighter than the previous model. 

If you’re in the market for a new supercar, you’ll struggle to find a better option. The R8’s quattro system does take a sprinkle of fun out of going around a corner sideways – although there is a rear-wheel-drive option – but it more than makes up for it with everything else. 

And you can even do it with the roof down, thanks to the R8 Spyder – although you’ll have to wait an extra 0.1 seconds to reach 62 mph. 

Body Styles

  • Coupe
  • Spyder

Trim Levels

R8 Coupe & Spyder
  • V10 RWD
  • V10 quattro
  • V10 Performance quattro
  • V10 Performance Carbon Black

Engines

R8 Coupe & Spyder

V10 RWD S tronic – 533bhp

V10 quattro S tronic – 562bhp

V10 performance quattro S tronic – 612bhp

Advantages of Audi R8

  • Best value in class
  • Sensational drive
  • Luxurious cabin

Disadvantages of Audi R8

  • Not as fun as competitors
  • Not as practical as others
  • Most desirable tech costs more

Audi e-tron

Audi e-tron

The e-tron is Audi’s only all-electric vehicle – so far, there are others in the pipeline. 

It’s based on the shape of the Audi Q7, although there are some noticeable differences. First and foremost is the option to have the e-tron in either a conventional SUV form or a more Q8-style Sportback. 

Another significant change is the lack of two extra seats. The Q7 is a seven-seater, the e-tron is only five. 

However, that does mean that the rear passengers enjoy more legroom. Extra space in the rear and also the lack of a centre floor tunnel – as the batteries are bolted to the bottom of the chassis – mean there’s ample room for three. 

The e-tron also enjoys a huge boot – 660 litres to be precise. According to Audi, that’s enough for 16 carry on cases. 

Audi e-tron Interior

It’s not slow either. The e-tron will reach 62 mph from a standing start in a little under seven seconds, and it’ll keep going until it reaches 130 mph.

When it comes to range, it depends on which spec you choose. The entry-level Technik will go for 193 miles on a single charge, while the Vorsprung will do 180. 

That’s simply because, in the Vorsprung, you get more car. Bigger wheels, upgraded navigation, cruise control and air conditioning, as well as digital door mirrors all adding to the luxury. But it will mean sacrificing 13 miles of driving. 

The Sportback meanwhile will cover around 240 miles on a single charge, and reduce your 0-62 mph time by more than a second.

Body Styles

  • SUV
  • Sportback

Trim Levels

e-tron
  • Technik
  • Sport
  • S line
  • Black Edition
  • Vorsprung
e-tron Sportback
  • S line
  • LaunchEdition

Engines

e-tron

50 quattro – 230kw

55 quattro – 300kw

Advantages of Audi e-tron

  • Doesn’t look like an electric car
  • Luxurious interior
  • Substantial range for an SUV

Disadvantages of Audi e-tron

  • Softer handling compared to competitors
  • Expensive
  • No seven-seat option

Find Your Audi Today

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